Most Christians appear to believe that the Resurrection was essentially a miraculous "rescusitation" of Jesus to confirm his ministry; the Church Fathers, in contrast, see the Resurrection as a radical ontological change in Christ. What is your view?

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Most Christians appear to believe that the Resurrection was essentially a miraculous "rescusitation" of Jesus to confirm his ministry; the Church Fathers, in contrast, see the Resurrection as a radical ontological change in Christ. What is your view?

Post by Admin on Mon Jul 24, 2017 5:23 pm

Current teaching on the Resurrection downplays any post-Resurrection change in Christ beyond that of a resuscitation, and that his now "glorified body" could now could pass through walls, as in his entering the upper room.) But is that real significance of the Resurrection-- a biological resuscitation which main point seems to be a demonstration of eternal Life and confirmation of Jesus' spiritual authority?
Do you see the Death and Resurrection of Christ in this way?
Or do you see Death and Resurrection as a radical transformation of Christ, a transformation of being and knowing-- even a divinization of Christ's Knowing? Do you think our spiritual journey leads to the exact same radical change in being and mode of knowing in us at death of self? and in Resurrection?  
Do you think also, along these lines, that the Mysteries of Christ are being recapitulating in us, and just as 'Jesus died, and Christ arose', as someone put, so we shall be transformed beyond self into Christ, the Heavenly Christ, our Eternal Life, in the very Glory of the Trinity.
Please give us your view...  

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Re: Most Christians appear to believe that the Resurrection was essentially a miraculous "rescusitation" of Jesus to confirm his ministry; the Church Fathers, in contrast, see the Resurrection as a radical ontological change in Christ. What is your view?

Post by Admin on Wed Jul 26, 2017 10:28 pm

I would like to propose a few thoughts on this question, beginning with a brief story.

The story is told of two great composers --let us just call them Brahms and Liszt-- standing on a bridge, pondering the future of music. Brahms stares bleakly at the rushing waters, shakes his head and says darkly: “All the great music has been written! There is just a finite number of notes to work with, Liszt. And a limited configuration of patterns. Soon it will be impossible to write an original melody!”
Liszt listens in silence for a time. Then a wry smile appears, and a shout: “Look, Brahms! Look there!” He points agitatedly to the water just disappearing beneath the bridge. “Oh no! There it goes-- the very last ripple!”
Listz is wryly suggesting that just as the river will not stop raising ripples, music is infinite and will never lack soaring complexities.
Perhaps, as well, this is somewhat analogous to the dynamic character of the soul’s knowledge of Christ. Just streams ripple with ever-new expressions, Christ (i.e., everyman’s eternal oneness in God) is revealed in the soul ever-new-- and ever-more expansively.
Can we say that Jesus also grew in knowlege of God, so grew in the “knowlege of Christ”? Since there is nothing more truly human than growth in God, and Jesus is fully human --indeed, archetypal Man-- doesn’t that mean he too grew in knowledge of God? And isn’t that growth in “Christ’s Own Knowing”?-- for only the fullness of Christ knows the fullness of the Trinity.
Indeed, a number of Church Fathers affirmed a radical change in knowing and being in Jesus, especially at his death and Resurrection. For these Fathers, his death was not prinicipally biological, and is Resurrection, far more than miraculous physical resusitation. Rather, as St. Hilary of Poitier wrote:
“It is one thing that he (Logos) was God before he was man,
another that he (Christ) was man and God,
and another that after being man and God,
he (Christ) was perfect man and perfect God.”

Christ was transformed by death and Resurrection (that Hilary’s third state of Christ, in above), only then becoming “perfect man and perfect God”. That surely means a change of being and knowing in Christ.
HIs exemplified the very spiritual journey we are NOW on, and we shall be transformed by very “Mysteries of Christ” (e.g., union with God, selfless living, death, Resurrection, Ascension, only known to us interiorly), Mysteries which God exemplified externally in Jesus’ life.
“The mystery of Christ is ours also. What was accomplished by the Head must be accomplished also in the members: Incarnation, death, and resurrection...” (Henri de Lubac).

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